Frontline: News War (Episode 1)

Judy Miller says she was only as good as her sources. That her sources mis-informed her, that she trusted them too much, trusted they wouldn’t mislead the the President. Knight-Ridder stood up as Clark Hoyt wrote that ‘nothing’ had changed in Iraq. They were no bigger threat now than they were 10-15 years ago. Eventually the Washington Post catches on and Walter Pincus writes that Iraq may have no WMD, that it was all wishful thinking on Saddam Hussein’s part. By the Summer of 2003 it was too late. It was obvious there was no WMD. Then Joe Wilson stood up, and recounted his role in the mess. The Vice Pres. wanted Niger followed-up on so the CIA sends Joe Wilson to follow-up. There was no link to Niger, nothing to substantiate the claim. So Joe Wilson steps forward to let people know that Bush 43 administration was stone-walling. The CIA took the fall for the Niger claim, saying they let that fact go in when they hadn’t meant to. Then they smeared Wilson’s wife, to punish him for his dissent. In doing so they may have broken some laws regarding classified information. So the Justice department has to go through the list of 11 point checklist, to determine whether a prosecution is in order.

WMD’s still weren’t found. Democrats in the Capitol wanted a special prosecutor, and John Ashcroft will step aside to let Patrick Fitzgerald investigate and prosecute. Matthew Cooper was told by Karl Rove that Valerie Plame was a CIA agent and may have authorized the Joe Wilson trip to Niger. The government depended on the journalists to keep the sources, the leakers identity secret and out of the articles. This is no Mark Felt, the third man at the FBI guidng Bob Woodward, it was the elite political advisor of the President who was performing damage control by leaking smears against Joe Wilson. Because the journalists wouldn’t reveal confidential sources, Scott Fitzgerald had to use a funny tactic that didn’t require the reporters to reveal sources, but they could still provide a deposition to the Grand Jury.

The Branzburg case went to the Supreme Court (many years ago) and stated there was no ‘confidentiality’ when it came to reporter and confidential sources, when a crime may be committed by the sources. What is the essential route that reporters have to investigate things for the public: “confidential sources”–William Safire. James Goodale was working at the NYTimes as the legal counsel to the paper. He moved to make sure every state had court cases that ruled in favor of confidentiality, and the reporter’s privilege of not having to reveal sources under subpeona. Judy Miller and Matt Cooper were being strong-armed by Patrick Fitzgerald, and the Supreme Court refused to hear the case. Branzburg stands, there is no protection of journalists from a Grand Jury seeking testimony concerning confidential sources used in a story.

Then things get worse. Judy Miller goes to jail because she will not testify, and won’t give up her notes. Some speculated that she was trying to cover her inaccurate reporting on WMDs in the NYTimes. Then Bob Woodward discovered that he had learned it first from Richard Armitage the Deputy Secretary of State under Colin Powell. Bob Novak had also found this out from Richard Armitage. The whole thing, the brou-ha-ha at its core is hinged on Richard Armitage. Poor guy, probably didn’t know how much he had affected¬† if not initiated this whole mess.

Stack Based Computers

Stack based computers will be the next scripted podcast for Carpetbomberz Inc.

If you don’t know what a stack-based computer is, do a Google search and apart from the Wikipedia entries on it, there’s some interesting ACM papers. For embedded CPUs that need hard real-time performance, it’s the only way to go. But what about general purpose stack-based machines? Well a company that we know so little about today, once showed the whole world the superior technology contained in the stack-based architecture. Burroughs released the B5000 mainframe back in 1963. And with that machine a number of big firsts were accomplished in the Computer industry. The first computer designed based on the software requirements for the machine. First OS written in a high level language ( version of ALGOL). The architecture still exists today in the Unisys architecture called, ClearPath. It’s definitely lasted a while.

The architect of the B5000 would eventually leave Burroughs to become a faculty member at the Computer Science Dept. at the University of Utah. And that became a hot bed for a lot of advances in Computer Graphics as it turns out. It’s amazing that the University of Utah was such a vibrant community, the way we think of Stanford U. in the early 1980’s.

I still haven’t really scripted the whole program yet. I may just launch into despite my ignorance and see what I come up with. Still I find stack-based computers endlessly fascinating.

Bomb Run – 021 Show Notes

Full show notes for the Carpet Bomberz Inc. podcast episode #21

 Bomb Run - 021 episode art

  • Lisp Machines – The Best Computer Ever!
    • From the wikipedia article on Symbolics and LMI
    • LISt Processing Language (LISP)
      • John McCarthy created it for Artificial Intelligence research
        • Developed on an IBM 704 mainframe eventually was ported
      • Very resource intensive
      • Slowed shared machines to a crawl, making research very expensive in clock cycles
      • Slow performance led to the idea of a dedicated machine for LISP
    • The Dedicated LISP machine ’73
      • Tom Knight and Richard Greenblatt create CONS
        • Hardwired to run basic LISP operations, speeding things up because they were in hardware not software
      • CONS is further refined and becomes CADR
        • Eventually 25 machines of this design are built and sold around MIT and outside MIT
      • Russ Noftsker steps in when it’s obvious there’s a market for LISP
    • Symbolics – February ’79
      • Russ Noftsker & the largest contingent of AI hackers leave
      • Most successful of the Lisp Machine companies
      • Most innovative designs (higher performance, graphics division)
      • Dedicated graphics were adopted by Hollywood led to further use of graphics in movies
    • Lisp Machines Inc. (LMI) – October ’79
      • Richard Greenblatt
      • Smallest contingent of the AI Lab hackers followed
      • Orders were provided through Control Data Corp project trying to do AI research
    • Richard Stallman – GNU Project
      • Richard and Marvin Minsky were the only staff left after the parting of the ways
      • Saw the culture get killed by the forming of the Lisp Machine
      • GNU project formed as a response to decimation of MIT hacker ranks
  • Finally, a minor contribution

    One of my favorite passtimes is to listen to a podcast called the Dawn and Drew Show. And let me tell you when you join their message board you begin the understand the value of Listener Generated Content. Adam Curry has benefited from this too with his podcast Daily Source Code. I’ve sent a few emails at different times to Adam, one of which got a mention on his show. Sometimes, I fall so far behind in listening to the shows I don’t feel I can make a legitimate contribution. I’ve been doing a lot better recently keeping up with Dawn and Drew episodes so I threw together this little ditty in Photoshop:Peanuts Dawn and Drew

    Hopefully, the next step would be a good phone line comment about something happening recently in one of the episodes. But I don’t want to get ahead of myself. Little steps, little baby steps.

    Word 2007 test post

    I’m recommitting myself to my podcast, Carpet Bomberz Inc. I’ve been too timid in publishing regular podcasts due to worries over whether or not I had waited long enough for interesting things to happen in my life in order to report on them. I have been reading Michael Geoghagen’s book Podcast Solutions in the early chapters where Geoghagen says to follow your bliss when it comes to the topic of the podcast. While I admit to being somewhat vain, and like reporting one what’s been going on, something more topic driven might prove to be a better vehicle for me podcasting-wise. I ran through about 20 topics, some of them related to musings about how certain inventions could have been improved, some of them comedic attempts at story telling, and others just straight discoveries of some obscure techno logia (technology and nostalgia). This list will now be the driving force for this next phase of the podcast. I’m going to also follow some other pointers like registering a domain name and putting a WordPress blog into production to support the Podcast. Blogposts, podcasts, Flickr galleries, del.icio.us tags will all combine into what will be a base for some Google Adsense banner ads for the Blog. If Adam Curry, Dawn and Drew can do it so can I. All I’m looking to do is support the cost of the website, domain registration and pay for the audio equipment I’ve already amassed, and nothing more. Fame is not an option.

    Test of Contribute and WordPress

    linktribution CSTB

    I just wanted to see if this would work. It appears that Contribute 4 from Adobe has three main pre-configured blog authentications setup in in it. Blogger, Typepad, and WordPress. Since I’m testing this WordPress blog, I thought I would devote a few entries to interoperability of the new Contribute and WordPress. So far so good. It seems pretty seamless, but it duplicates a lot of the web interface within WordPress. So I don’t know if it’s easier or not. It may be the case that hardcore Contribute users would easily move between blogs and websites due to the integration. But I doubt you’re going to get one to start using a blog simply because it supposed to be easier to use Contribute. It doesn’t hide the forms heavy interface of just about every templating/blogging/content management software out on the Internets.

    And to my New Media Centers compatriot on Prince Edward Island: Can’t Stop the Back Channel! Link-tribution you all!

    Test no. 3

    Since I first fired up this Blog to tryout WP2.0 I haven't tried very hard to put it through its paces. Some things like plug-ins are what I find most facinating about WP2.0. I know some big bloggin websites that have relied heavily on plug-ins for their functionality. What plug-ins do you think are the most valuable for folks running blogs off of WP2.0?