Apple patents hint at future AR screen tech for iPad | Electronista

A lot of Augmented Reality today is centered on software developments running on smartphones. Whether they be Android or iPhone doesn’t matter they want those wonderfully powerful embedded computers available to do all the work onboard the device itself. But, what if the device was not required to do all that heavy lifting itself. What if it off-loaded that work to a data center in North Carolina and beamed back the results to your device?

Distracting chatter is useful. But thanks to RSS (remember that?) it’s optional. (via Jon Udell)

I too am a big believer in RSS. And while I am dipping toes into Facebook and Twitter the bulk of my consumption goes into the big Blogroll I’ve amassed and refined going back to Radio Userland days in 2002. When I left the pageview business I walked away from an engine that had, for… Continue reading Distracting chatter is useful. But thanks to RSS (remember that?) it’s optional. (via Jon Udell)

Kim Cameron returns to Microsoft as indie ID expert • The Register

Anybody who can effectively navigate in a corporate environment of a huge software developer and evangelize something like Identity Management, well they have my undivided attention. Most folks treat it like a Directory Service when in fact it’s a free standing kind of thing that any application can subscribe to in order to determine access rights to services individuals grant rights to. I don’t want to live in an Internet that has more Stove Pipes than there were just 6 years ago.

Goal oriented visualizations? (via Erik Duval’s Weblog)

Visualizations and their efficacy always takes me back to Edward Tufte‘s big hard cover books on Infographics (or Chart Junk when it’s done badly). In terms of this specific category, visualization leading to a goal I think it’s still very much a ‘general case’. But examples are always better than theoretical descriptions of an ideal.… Continue reading Goal oriented visualizations? (via Erik Duval’s Weblog)

JSON Activity Streams Spec Hits Version 1.0

Whether it is Twitter or Facebook or what have you, each and every new social networking service is starting to slowly pull back from sharing its data with the world at large. Twitter adherents are crowing about the death of RSS/Atom publish and subscribe feeds open for the whole world to see. Now you need to be a ‘member’ to see anything and I would argue there’s got to be a better way. Let’s start with a published, open spec.

The Sandy Bridge Review: Intel Core i7-2600K – AnandTech

The newest generation of Intel chips was demonstrated at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Some of the technology fanboi websites got early samples of chips and motherboards that use the new chips and chipsets. Aside from having the memory controller on the CPU, another benefit is the integrated graphics chip can be re-purposed to accelerate video transcoding. Intel calls it QuickSync, and I call it effing magic.

Announcing the first free software Blu-ray encoder

Blu-ray is still a small bit of total movie sales. And online downloads of movies are still in MPEG-2 format with some HD versions available (in 720p). I know there’s a market for higher resolution and higher frame rates and surround sound. But we’re still not there yet. Until Blu-Ray becomes more widespread, it’s probably a good idea to become familiar with the encoding and transcoding tools that create Blu-Ray compliant video clips

iPad release imminent – caveat emptor

iPad is all anyone will be talking about for a while. And since I’ve tried to write about its innovations or lack of ‘true’ innovations (jacking up clockspeed is not an innovation) now comes time where real people get to weigh in. But that’s not me, I haven’t used an iPad. So I’ll try to aggregate the stories of people who have.

AppleInsider | Custom Apple A4 iPad chip estimated to be $1 billion investment

What’s the point of licensing computer chip designs from another company if it costs about the 1/3 the price of building it yourself? That seems like a rhetorical question, but I always assumed that people who licensed technology from ARM holdings were aiming to save tons of money compared to fabricating the chips themselves. So how does the Apple iPad A4 cpu figure into this? Well it’s a custom CPU, but according to NYTimes creating a new cpu is serious business.