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24 hrs. later and here we are

U.S. confirmed cases just raced up to catch up with Germany and Spain.

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How high's the water mama?

It was only 3,056 this morning at 8AM EDT

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Mimetically Yours, Weird Buildings — CogDogBlog

It happens so often and ends up being blogged that I’ve tagged this phenomenon freetousewonders. I open a new browser tab in Chrome and the… 560 more words

Mimetically Yours, Weird Buildings — CogDogBlog

Mimesis: that old saw from my class in Aesthetics circa 1992

When I was in college I had to take a class in Aesthetics to finish out a degree program. It was interesting, one of those type classes that people “avoid” because it requires reading and writing, and occasional trips to the library to look something up. Suffice to say, it introduced me to the idea in philosophy of “Mimesis” and it’s role in art. For thousands of years philosophy has attempted to define why we do art, the motivations, etc. And as you look WAAAaay back, it’s all about representation, rooted in experience, but not always “photographically realistic”. The fantasy, the dream also are “experience” albeit, more fleeting, cursory less rooted than the “world” as we would name it. So what made me think of this was the old picture I remember bumping into, a drawing in fact made by Robert Venturi for his book: Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture. In that book appears an argument that “Roadside America” type buildings, so-called “Mimetic Architecture” is in many ways tied to the “International Style” or “Modern Architecture” as extolled and practiced starting in Europe around the beginning of the 20th Century. A building as an “object” let’s say. Here’s Venturi’s drawing:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Duck

Venturi wanted to draw the comparison to say Modern Architecture or the International Style treated buildings as “objects”, almost like sculpture. Representative of “something else” other than it’s physical, actual function as a building. And the spectacle of this is made more apparent when you hastily throw them up together with an equals sign in between. This was meant to convey Venturi’s beliefs regarding the disconnect between Modern Architecture and “what it does”. And further to emphasize how big a disconnect Modern Architecture tried to achieve with its past history to pursue the original and novel as an end in itself. This is what I really think of when I see Mimetic Architecture, duck buildings and Roadside America. Novel and new might get people to stop and look. But you also have to ask yourself, “what does it do?” I think that’s the real benefit to the ideas Venturi, Scott-Brown & Associates brought to the table when they first started getting commissions and when Robert and Denise started teaching at University. It’s valuable even today.

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#trumpslump

Ya know, a lotta people are sayin’ #trumpslump
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Worst Daytona 500 EVAR (2020)

So Fox decided to queue up last years race (2019) and obscure the fact that the real race hasn’t even started yet. We’re watching last year’s 2019 race on broadcast TV. This sux. How are they going to get the season opener done? Are they running it tomorrow? seems like they shoulda started the race early, say 1:30 instead of waiting for all the pomp/circumstance of POTUS coming up from Mar-A-Lago to insert himself and Melania into the 2020 Daytona 500. That guy has been Prez for 4 years now and NEVER attended a race. LAME!

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Another Windows 10 bug: Now it seems the search bar doesn’t work – CNET — CNET News

The search service built into Windows 10 appears to be malfunctioning. Microsoft has yet to issue a fix.

Another Windows 10 bug: Now it seems the search bar doesn’t work – CNET — CNET News

Funny thing happened at work today for me. At ~10:00am EST my Search Box stopped working. The thing MS got me addicted to, looking things up no matter what, well that broke utterly. Meaning, I no longer know where to look for and find the CMD command. Instead I just type right into the Search Box and MS presents it too me. Asks me “Do you want to launch it as Administrator?” etc. But that came to a screeching halt when all I could see, all I was presented was a big old dumb grey rectangle with no links, no recent activities, no “suggestions”. Worse yet as you typed into the box, NOTHING happened.

I restarted. Nothing happened. I ran full runs of System Checker (sfc /scannow) also the DISM.exe /restorehealth. NOTHING fixed it. In desperation I started looking up the problem, seeing everything from what I had already done (reboot/sfc/dism) or worse suggestions like editing the registry. But fact is, I couldn’t do that simple step because I don’t know the path to the regedit.exe command anymore because Windows Search was supposed to remember that FOR ME!

And now I’m reading this article from C|NET and find out it was a “thing”. Eventually I got clued into the fact SearchUI.exe was suspended for some unknown reason. I went to Task Manager and stopped it, then killed the whole process tree. That force it to restart, but the SearchUI went right back into “suspended” mode. Then all the time I spent (30 minutes or more) passed without anything working and magically SearchUI.exe went into start mode around 10:30AM EST and it all just came back on it’s own miraculously. So weird, so bizarre, and I thought I was the only one experiencing the problem today. Thanks CNET!

This just in,…
And just now I read this little missive in The Verge: https://www.theverge.com/2020/2/5/21124204/windows-search-down-blank-results-issues-microsoft-bing-outage. It appears the issue started at 8AM EST (before I arrived at work) and cleared up when MS remediated the issue by 11:35AM. My issues seemed to clear up at 10:30. So I guess I got lucky. But I was certain I broke my OS and was getting ready to backup data and re-install the OS. Man that’s frightening to see happen without anything so much as a MS announcement to sit and wait.

Searching for anything on Win10 today was impossible. Local files, the Internet it all came to a screeching HALT.
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State of the Union? absolutely yes!

An oldie by a goody. Especially right about now. Impeachment hopefully winds down and concludes next week. Iowa Caucus starts next week too. Brexit is finalized and going into effect. (yeah)
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Police video shows Cellebrite device in action, says it ‘minimizes intrusion’ — 9to5Mac

The police service in Scotland has posted a video showing a Cellebrite device in action, accessing text messages, photos, and calendar entries from a smartphone. The same device is used by many US law enforcement agencies… more… The post Police video shows Cellebrite device in action, says it ‘minimizes intrusion’ appeared first on 9to5Mac.

Police video shows Cellebrite device in action, says it ‘minimizes intrusion’ — 9to5Mac

Cellebrite and GrayKey are the 2 Eight hundred pound gorillas in the room when it comes to Law Enforcement absconding and cracking mobile devices. Between this and facial recognition and a multitude of other persistent strongly identifying characteristics, there are no more secrets. And know this too, what’s good for the private citizen is equally good for law enforcement. Who watches teh Watchmenz? These same “tools” and toyz will fall into the hands of non-Law Enforcement entities and actors and eventually the contracted security companies (think Booz Allen Hamilton et. al.) Just because you can create a product that breaks into mobile devices doesn’t mean you should, even if the entrepreneurial opportunity outweigh possible negative outcomes. It’s not a suitcase nuclear weapon, but that’s not an absolute. it’s a sliding scale on the spectrum of weapons. And as police depts. get more militarized, Cellebrite and GrayKey will find their way further down into your local constabulary.

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Computing Education Lessons Learned from the 2010’s: What I Got Wrong

I’m definitely going to lookup and read the Charisma Machine by Morgan Ames. I wasn’t aware anyone had done any review of the One Laptop Per Child project at Media Lab.

Computing Education Research Blog

There’s a trend on Twitter over the last few weeks where people (especially the academics I follow) tweet about their accomplishments over the last 10 years. They write about the number of papers published, the number of PhD students graduated, and the amount of grant money they received. It’s a nice reflective activity which highlights many great things that have happened in the 2010’s.

I started this blog in June 2009, so most of it has been written in the 2010’s. The most interesting thing I find in looking back is what I got wrong. There were lots of things that I thought were true, ideas that I worked on, but I later realized were wrong. Since I use this blog as a thinking space, it’s a sign of learning that I now realize that some of that thinking was wrong. And for better or worse, here’s a permanent Internet…

View original post 866 more words

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The Odyssey Project – A Domains Origin Story — Gardner Writes

For all that follows, there’s much more to be said–but if I try to say it all, the post will never be written or shared. So let’s get started with this beginning. Recently a Twitter thread emerged on the origins of the “Domain of One’s Own” project (usually abbreviated DoOO). Jon Udell’s epic talk at…

The Odyssey Project – A Domains Origin Story — Gardner Writes

I lurvs me some Origin Stories, especially from the wild frontier prior to the rise of YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. Web 2.0 was really going to be a chance to set a course and follow it to a less bubble-like conclusion, exploding on it’s way up-up-up into the future. Being able to make one’s own tools seemed like a good starting point, but as is often the case you bump into the limits of time and your current ability. Luckily, as Gardner points out, hosting companies like Bluehost had attempted to automate, script, GUI-ify much of the existing tools in a way meant to lower their costs of supporting end-users. The upshot in Gardner’s eyes were these interfaces lowered the barrier to end-users actually USING these tools at a level they wouldn’t normally be allowed in a Learning Management System context. The promise was, and in some ways is STILL there. We just need more people who are better able to convince the populace they should care. And now more than ever the Kelly-Anne Conways extolling alternative facts have proven we need to care. Otherwise we do get fooled again (remember Pets.com?) and rhyme with history like the civilizations of yore. Here’s to the future, again, we can do/learn to do, these things, or at minimum learn to CARE.