U.S. Requests for Google User Data Spike 29 Percent in Six Months | Threat Level | Wired.com

In a fight between Superman and Spiderman who would win? That’s a game we used to play as kids. Nowadays the question is more like in a fight between your personal data and a Government request to Google to access that data who would win? All evidence points to you being the loser. Read On:

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Kim Cameron returns to Microsoft as indie ID expert • The Register

Anybody who can effectively navigate in a corporate environment of a huge software developer and evangelize something like Identity Management, well they have my undivided attention. Most folks treat it like a Directory Service when in fact it’s a free standing kind of thing that any application can subscribe to in order to determine access rights to services individuals grant rights to. I don’t want to live in an Internet that has more Stove Pipes than there were just 6 years ago.

JSON Activity Streams Spec Hits Version 1.0

Whether it is Twitter or Facebook or what have you, each and every new social networking service is starting to slowly pull back from sharing its data with the world at large. Twitter adherents are crowing about the death of RSS/Atom publish and subscribe feeds open for the whole world to see. Now you need to be a ‘member’ to see anything and I would argue there’s got to be a better way. Let’s start with a published, open spec.

From Big Data to NoSQL: The ReadWriteWeb Guide to Data Terminology (Part 1)

I don’t know if you have ever heard of Relational Databases or Structured Query Language. They became di rigeur after 1977 in most corporate data centers pushing more power into the hands of users instead of programmers. But that type of structured data can only carry you so far until you bump against its limits. In this age of Social Networking and data gathering on users, we are severely testing the limits of the last big thing in databases.

Bye, Flip. We’ll Miss You | Epicenter | Wired.com

I’m not just a fan, I’ve owned a few video cameras as new technology has displaced the old. First there was 8mm, then miniDV, and then the solid state revolution as exemplified by Pure Digital’s once disposable video camera. It was a project created for a drug store chain, but hackers showed the company their product could be easily adapted to consumer electronics device. The rest they say is history, and so too now is the Flip.

Intel lets outside chip maker into its fabs • The Register

    According to Greg Martin, a spokesman for the FPGA maker, Achronix can compete with Xilinx and Altera because it has, at 1.5GHz in its current Speedster1 line, the fastest such chips on the market. And by moving to Intel’s 22nm technology, the company could have ramped up the clock speed to 3GHz. via […]

The Eternal Value of Privacy by Bruce Schneier

Traveling over the holiday I got to thinking about the pat down searches inbound flights to the U.S. were forced to go through. In the good ‘ol days of the 1970s we only had to deal with simple metal detectors and the X-ray machine. That was it. But now we have to continuously add new and more complicated measures to simply wait for an airline flight. Security Theater at its best an as Bruce Schneier points out, if we are willing to give up our freedoms to engage in Security Theater we deserve neither our freedom nor our security.